NCERT Class 10 History Before the Industrial Revolution

Read and download NCERT Class 10 History Before the Industrial Revolution chapter in NCERT book for Class 10 History. You can download latest NCERT eBooks for 2021 chapter wise in PDF format free from Studiestoday.com. This History textbook for Class 10 is designed by NCERT and is very useful for students. Please also refer to the NCERT solutions for Class 10 History to understand the answers of the exercise questions given at the end of this chapter

Before The Industrial Revolution Class 10 History NCERT

Class 10 History students should refer to the following NCERT Book chapter Before The Industrial Revolution in standard 10. This NCERT Book for Grade 10 History will be very useful for exams and help you to score good marks

Before The Industrial Revolution NCERT Class 10

 

Before the Industrial Revolution

All too often we associate industrialisation with the growth of factory industry. When we talk of industrial production we refer to factory production. When we talk of industrial workers we mean factory workers. Histories of industrialisation very often begin with the setting up of the first factories. There is a problem with such ideas. Even before factories began to dot the landscape in England and Europe, there was large-scale industrial production for an international market. This was not based on factories. Many historians now refer to this phase of industrialisation as proto-industrialisation.

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, merchants from the towns in Europe began moving to the countryside, supplying money to peasants and artisans, persuading them to produce for an international market. With the expansion of world trade and the acquisition of colonies in different parts of the world, the demand for goods began growing. But merchants could not expand production within towns. This was because here urban crafts and trade guilds were powerful. These were associations of producers that trained craftspeople, maintained control over production, regulated competition and prices, and restricted the entry of new people into the trade. Rulers granted different guilds the monopoly right to produce and trade in specific products. It was therefore difficult for new merchants to set up business in towns. So they turned to the countryside. In the countryside poor peasants and artisans began working for merchants. As you have seen in the textbook last year, this was a time when open fields were disappearing and commons were being enclosed. Cottagers and poor peasants who had earlier depended on common lands for their survival, gathering their firewood, berries, vegetables, hay and straw, had to now look for alternative sources of income. Many had tiny plots of land which could not provide work for all members of the household. So when merchants came around and offered advances to produce goods for them, peasant households eagerly agreed. By working for the merchants, they could remain in the countryside and continue to cultivate their small plots. Income from proto-industrial production supplemented their shrinking income from cultivation. It also allowed them a fuller use of their family labour resources.

Within this system a close relationship developed between the town and the countryside. Merchants were based in towns but the work was done mostly in the countryside. A merchant clothier in England purchased wool from a wool stapler, and carried it to the spinners; the yarn (thread) that was spun was taken in subsequent stages of production to weavers, fullers, and then to dyers. The finishing was done in London before the export merchant sold the cloth in the international market. London in fact came to be known as a finishing centre.

This proto-industrial system was thus part of a network of commercial exchanges. It was controlled by merchants and the goods were produced by a vast number of producers working within their family farms, not in factories. At each stage of production 20 to 25 workers were employed by each merchant. This meant that each clothier was controlling hundreds of workers.

1.1 The Coming Up of the Factory

The earliest factories in England came up by the 1730s. But it was only in the late eighteenth century that the number of factories multiplied. The first symbol of the new era was cotton. Its production boomed in the late nineteenth century. In 1760 Britain was importing 2.5 million pounds of raw cotton to feed its cotton industry. By 1787 this import soared to 22 million pounds. This increase was linked to a number of changes within the process of production. Let us look briefly at some of these.

A series of inventions in the eighteenth century increased the efficacy of each step of the production process (carding, twisting and spinning, and rolling). They enhanced the output per worker, enabling each worker to produce more, and they made possible the production of stronger threads and yarn. Then Richard Arkwright created the cotton mill. Till this time, as you have seen, cloth production was spread all over the countryside and carried out within village households. But now, the costly new machines could be purchased, set up and maintained in the mill. Within the mill all the processes were brought together under one roof and management. This allowed a more careful supervision over the production process, a watch over quality, and the regulation of labour, all of which had been difficult to do when production was in the countryside.


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NCERT Class 10 History Industrialisation in the Colonies
NCERT Class 10 History Market for Goods
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NCERT Class 10 History New Forms of Publication
NCERT Class 10 History Novels in the Colonial World
NCERT Class 10 History Politics in the City
NCERT Class 10 History Print and Censorship
NCERT Class 10 History Print Comes to Europe
NCERT Class 10 History Rebuilding a World Economy
NCERT Class 10 History Religion and Anti colonialism
NCERT Class 10 History Religious Reform and Public Debates
NCERT Class 10 History Social Change in the City
NCERT Class 10 History The Age of Revolutions 1830 1848
NCERT Class 10 History The City in Colonial India
NCERT Class 10 History The Communist Movement
NCERT Class 10 History The Dilemma of Colonial Education
NCERT Class 10 History The End of the War
NCERT Class 10 History The First Printed Books
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NCERT Class 10 History The Inter war Economy
NCERT Class 10 History The Making of Germany and Italy
NCERT Class 10 History The Making of Nationalism in Europe
NCERT Class 10 History The Nation and Its Heroes
NCERT Class 10 History The Nation and its History
NCERT Class 10 History The Nationalist Movement in Indo China
NCERT Class 10 History The Nineteenth Century
NCERT Class 10 History The Nineteenth Century1
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NCERT Class 10 History The Peculiarities of Industrial Growth
NCERT Class 10 History The Print Revolution and Its Impact
NCERT Class 10 History The Reading Mania
NCERT Class 10 History The Rise of the Novel
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NCERT Class 10 History The Vision of Modernisation
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