CBSE Class 10 English Unseen Passage C

Read CBSE Class 10 English Unseen Passage C below, students should read unseen passage for class 10 English available on Studiestoday.com with solved questions and answers. These topic wise unseen comprehension for class 10 English with answers have been prepared by English teacher of Grade 10. These short passages have been designed as per the latest syllabus for class 10 English and if practiced thoroughly can help you to score good marks in standard 10 English class tests and examinations

CBSE Class 10 English Unseen Passage C. Students should do unseen passages for class 10 English which will help them to get better marks in English class tests and exams. Unseen passages are really scoring and practicing them on regular basis will be very useful. Refer to the unseen passage below with answers.

Unseen Passage for Class 10

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow : 

The difference in the ways of thinking and perception in the people of two different generations, which results in behavioural differences and sometimes, conflict among them is usually called generation gap.

Generation gap is generally seen in the family between parents and their children. It is not only because of the gap in age, but also because of the way parents react to a particular situation. Children being very young and immature do not understand the way of thinking of their parents. In many cases, the parents, even if they are matured, do not empathize with the changing values and thinking pattern of the modern world. This creates a communication gap between these two generations.

Generation gap between parents and children is mostly caused by parents themselves. They do not talk openly to their children and do not take part in solving their problems. This behaviour gives the impression about parents being authoritative persons, because they only dictate without understanding the problems faced by their children. As a result, the children become mentally isolated from their parents. Some parents become so busy with their work that they don’t spend quality time with their family, which makes them completely unaware of how their children are growing, what kind of mentality is being developed in them, and so on. This ultimately creates a gap between them. They only realize it when it is too late. 

Changes in technology have led to the generation gap in this modern world. Children tend to spend most of their time with their digital devices and are so busy with social media, that they do not discuss their problems with their parents. The internet provides solutions to most of the worldly problems. So children, instead of contacting their own parents, seek the help of internet in case of any problem, thus again reducing the communication, leading to a generation gap between them.

The generation gap has greatly increased these days because the time is changing fast and people find it difficult to cope up with this change. To overcome this problem, parents should show interest in all matters of their children and deal with them positively instead of just scolding them and leaving them alone to deal with their problems. Giving time to the children, having open communication, and allowing the child to feel free and not in any kind of pressure, will eventually reduce the generation gap to a tolerable extent.

(A) Answer any four of the following questions :

Question. What causes the gap between the parents and their children ?
Answer : The gap between the parents and children is caused firstly, due to the difference in the ways of thinking, which leads to misunderstanding.
Secondly, due to the way parents react to a particular situation and immaturity on the part of children to understand various situations.
Parents don’t empathize with changing values.

Question. Why is generation gap there in the families?
Answer : There is generation gap due to age gap and the way the parents react to a particular situation.

Question. Why do children view their parents as dictatorial ?
Answer : Parents often do not talk openly to their children.
They usually dictate without understanding the problems faced by their children.

Question. How has advancement in technology led to the generation gap ?
Answer : Children spend most of their time with digital devices and there is no communication with parents.

Question. What steps need to be taken to bridge this gap ?
Answer : Parents should show interest in all the matters of their children, should have open communication, should allow children to put forth their views and should show positivity.

(B) Answer any four of the following : 

Question. What is meant by the word, ‘particular’ ? 
(a) specific
(b) usual
(c) normal
(d) instant

Answer : (a) specific

Question. What is meant by the word, ‘isolated’ ? (Para 3)
(a) bound
(b) grown
(c) separated
(d) unconcerned

Answer : (c) separated

Question. What is the antonym of the word, ‘solutions’ ?
(a) difficulties
(b) irritations
(c) problems
(d) decisions

Answer : (c) problems

Question. What is the antonym of the word, ‘reduce’ ?
(a) tear
(b) expand
(c) open
(d) abridge

Answer : (b) expand

Question. Most of the parents don’t spend ___________ time with their family.
(a) free
(b) quality
(c) weekend
(d) leisure

Answer : (b) qualitya

Class 10 English Unseen Passage

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow :

Tell someone that you are going to a convention of accountants and you might get a few yawns, yet money and how it works is probably one of the most interesting things on the earth. It is fascinating and almost magical, how money appeared on our planet. Unlike most developments we enjoy, which can be traced back to a source, civilisation or inventor, money appeared in places then unconnected all over the world in a remarkably similar way.

Consider the American Indians using Wampum, West Africans trading in decorative metallic objects called Manillas and the Fijians economy based on whale’s teeth, some of which are still legal tender; add to that shells, amber, ivory, decorative feathers, cattle including oxen and pigs, a large number of stones including jade and quartz, which have all been used for trade across the world, and we get a taste of the variety of accepted currency. There is something charming and child- like imagining primitive societies, our ancestors, using all these colourful forms of money. As long as everyone concerned can agree on a value, this is a sensible thing for a community to do. 

After all, the person who has what you need might not need what you have to trade. Money solves that problem neatly. Real value with each exchange, and everyone gaining from the convenience. The idea is really inspired, which might explain why so many diverse minds came up with it. Once money is accepted as a form of exchange, those who produce, loan out and manipulate the quantity of money are obviously in a very strong position. They are the “Money Changers”.

“History records that the money changers have used every form of abuse, intrigue, deceit, and violent means possible to maintain their control over governments by controlling money and its issuance,” said President James Madison.

Money, money, money, it’s always just been there, right? Wrong. Obviously it’s issued by the government to make it easy for us to exchange things. Wrong again! Truth is, most people don’t realise that the issuing of money is essentially a private business, and that the privilege of issuing money has been a major bone of contention throughout history.

(A) Answer the following questions : (Any four) 

Question. What is fascinating and almost magical ? 
Answer : How money appeared on the Earth is fascinating and magical.

Question. Which currencies did the American Indians and West Africans use ?
Answer : American Indians used Wampum and west Africans used metallic objects called Manillas.

Question. What is something charming and childlike to imagine ?
Answer : Primitive societies using colorful forms of money is something charming and child-like to imagine.

Question. What problem does the money solve ?
Answer : When a person who has what you need does not need what you trade,money solves the problem nicely.

Question. What do you understand by ‘Money Changers’?
Answer : People who produce, loan out and manipulate the quantity of money are called ‘Money Changers’.

(B) Answer the following questions : (Any four) 

Question. What is meant by the word, ‘convention’ ? 
(a) conference
(b) fair
(c) wave
(d) competition

Answer : (a) conference

Question. What is meant by the word, ‘fascinating’ ? 
(a) beautiful
(b) valuable
(c) attractive
(d) republic

Answer : (c) attractive

Question. What is meant by the word, ‘convention’ ? 
(a) comfort
(b) escape
(c) clown
(d) transport

Answer : (a) comfort

Question. What is meant by the word, ‘intrigue’ ? 
(a) plot
(b) interest
(c) interval
(d) fear

Answer : (b) interest

Question. Most people don’t realise that the issue of money is __________ business.
(a) personal
(b) private
(c) social
(d) none’s

Answer : (b) private

Unseen Passage for Class 10 with Answers

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow : 

Evelyn Glennie was born in 1965 and grew up on a farm near Aberdeen in Scotland. She loved playing music, and her ambition was to become a solo percussionist. She started having problems with her ears and began to lose her hearing. By the time she was twelve, she was deaf. She couldn’t hear at all. Evelyn became very angry; it seemed to her that she would never fulfil her dream of being a great musician.

After a while Evelyn stopped being angry and instead found ways of adapting her playing to suit her deafness. At the age of sixteen, she became the first deaf student at the Royal Academy in London. She went on to make lots of CDs and is now famous for being the world’s only full time solo percussionist. Evelyn likes to play unusual instruments and has over a thousand instruments some of which she has made herself. She likes to play with musicians from all over the world, and requests composers to create music especially for her. An example of this is a piece, which was composed for her by the jazz composer Diango Bates, for which kitchen pots and pans were used as instruments. Her sixteen solo albums (including twelve on the RCA/BMG label) have reached a remarkably diverse public, as have her numerous collaborations with musicians from the non-classical world.

Glennie contends that hearing is a form of touch, and that everyone, whether “deaf” or not, processes sound in an individual way. When Evelyn performs, she doesn’t wear shoes or socks. This is to enable her to feel the music through the floor and her body. Usually, percussionists play at the back of the Orchestra, Evelyn plays at the front so that she can lip-read signals from the conductor. Glennie has said that she doesn’t want an operation to cure her deafness; she likes being who she is and doesn’t want to change the way she works. Like many other courageous people, she tries hard to help others. She has helped many deaf children by giving them an opportunity to learn a musical instrument.

(A) Answer any four of the following questions : 

Question. What was Glennie’s ambition?
Answer : Glennie’s ambition was to become a solo percussionist.

Question. Why did she become very angry?
Answer : Glennie became angry because she thought she would never be able to fulfill her dream of becoming a great musician.

Question. What is she now famous for?
Answer : Glennie is now famous for being the world’s only full time solo percussionist.

Question. Why does she not wear shoes or socks when she performs?
Answer : Evelyn Glennie does not wear shoes or socks when she performs to enable her to feel the music through the floor and her body.

Question. Why did Glennie refuse to get herself cured?
Answer : Glennie refused to be cured because she liked being who she was and didn’t want to change the way she worked.

(B) Answer any four of the following by choosing the correct options :

Question. What is meant by the word, ‘ambition’? 
(a) goal in life
(b) hope
(c) employment
(d) success

Answer : (a) goal in life

Question. Find the word opposite in meaning to ‘happy’.
(a) solo
(b) angry
(c) hearing
(d) helpless

Answer : (b) angry

Question. What is meant by the word ‘unusual’? 
(a) uncommon
(b) unknown
(c) employment
(d) uncover

Answer : (a) uncommon

Question. Find the word opposite in meaning to ‘disable’.
(a) enable
(b) retain
(c) keep
(d) draw

Answer : (a) enable

Question. Find the synonym of the word ‘content’.
(a) satisfy
(b) assert
(c) keep
(d) draw

Answer : (a) satisfy

Comprehensions for Class 10 English with Solutions

1. In a disarmingly frank talk at the Indian Merchants Chamber in Mumbai the Japanese Ambassador in India dwelt at length with issues that exercise the mind of Japanese investors when they consider investment proposals in India.

2. Raising the question “What comparative advantages does India offer as an investment market ?” he said though labour in India is inexpensive, wage levels are offset by productivity level to a large extent.

3. Acknowledging that vastness of the Indian market is a great inducement for investment in manufacturing industry he wondered if it was justifiable to provide that overseas remittance of profit in foreign exchange to be fully covered by exchange earnings as had been done. Significantly, on the eve of the prime Minister exports, meeting this demand.

4. The Ambassador said foreign investors needed to be assured of the continuity and consistency of the liberalization policy and the fact that new measures had been put into force by means of administrative notifications without amending Government laws acted as a damper.

5. The Ambassador pleaded for speedy formulation of the exit policy and pointed to the highly restrictive control by the Government on disinterment by foreign partners in joint ventures in India.

6. While it is ail too easy to dismiss critical comment on conditions in India contemptuously, there can be little about that if foreign investment is to be wooed assiduously, we will have to meet exacting international standard and cater at partially to what we may consider the idiosyncrasies of our foreign collaborators. The Japanese too have passed through a stage in the fifties when their products were divided as substandard and shoddy. That they have come out of the ordeal of fire-to emerge as an economic super power speaks as much of their doggedness to pursue goals against all odds as of their ability to improvise internationally acceptable standards.

7. There is no gain-saying that the past record of Japanese investment is a poor benchmark for future expectations.

Question. According to the Japanese Ambassador, which of the following motivates the foreign investors to invest in Indian manufacturing industry ?
(i) Very large scope of Indian market
(ii) Overseas remittance of profit in foreign exchange
(iii) High productivity level
(iv) None of these
Ans : (i) Very large scope of Indian market

Question. The purpose of the author in writing this passage seems to be to-
(i) discourage foreign investment in India
(ii) critically examine Indian investment environment
(iii) paint a rosy picture of India’s trade and commerce
(iv) criticize Government’s liberalization policy
Ans : (ii) critically examine Indian investment environment

Question. Which of the following suggestions were expected by the Japanese Ambassador ?
A. Speedy formulation of the exist policy
B. Imposing restrictions of disinvested by foreign partners in joint ventures in India.
C. Continuity and consistency of the liberalization policy
(i) A and B only
(ii) B and C only
(iii) A and C only
(iv) All of these
Ans : (iv) All of these

Question.  Which of the following statement(s) is/are true about the critical comments on investment conditions in India?
A. These comments are difficult to be countered.
B. These comments are received from various international quarters.
C. These comments are based more on bases than on facts.
(i) Only C
(ii) Only B
(iii) Only A
(iv) None of these
Ans : (ii) Only B

Question.  According to the Japanese Ambassador’ India offers a comparative advantage of foreign investors in terms of -
(i) inexpensive labour
(ii) abysmally low wage levels
(iii) higher productivity
(iv) None of these
Ans : (iv) None of these

Question.  Choose the word which is most nearly the samein mea ning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage.
SHODDY
(i) extraordinary
(ii) unprofitable
(iii) cheap
(iv) disadvantageous
Ans : (iii) cheap

Question.  The author has appreciated the Japanese for their
(i) quality of products manufactured in the fifties.
(ii) passing through an ordeal
(iii) perseverance for raising quality of products 
(iv) None of these
Ans : (iii) perseverance for raising quality of products

Question. For seeking more and more foreign investment,the author suggests that we should -
(i) satisfy fully the whims of our foreign collaborators
(ii) dismiss all critical comments on Indian conditions
(iii) link profit repatriations to exports
(iv) raise the quality of product of match international standards
Ans : (iv) raise the quality of product of match international standards

Question. From the passage it can be inferred that the author is -
(i) a political commentator
(ii) a secretary of the Japanese Ambassador
(iii) A Japanese investor
(iv) an Indian investor
Ans : (i) a political commentator

Question. The author attributes Japan’s emergence as an economic super power to -
A. their ability to overcome any ordeal.
B. their tenacity and perseverance despite unfavourable circumstances.
C. their ability to improvise and adapt to globally acceptable quality levels.
(i) A and B only
(ii) B and C only
(iii) A and C only
(iv) All of these
Ans : (iv) All of these

Question. Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.
CONTEMPTUOUSLY
(i) amicably
(ii) reasonably
(iii) respectfully
(iv) methodically
Ans : (iii) respectfully

Question. Choose the word which is most nearly the same in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage.
ASSIDUOUSLY
(i) persistently
(ii) hearty
(iii) feebly
(iv) deliberately
Ans : (iv) deliberately

Question. Choose the word which is most nearly the same in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage.
IDIOSYNCRASIES
(i) demands
(ii) needs
(iii) deviations
(iv) ideologies
Ans : (iv) ideologies

Question. Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.
INDUCEMENT
(i) incentive
(ii) motive
(iii) impediment
(iv) temptation
Ans : (iii) impediment

Question. Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.
JUSTIFIABLE
(i) unreasonable
(ii) formidable
(iii) irrevocable
(iv) unscrupulous
Ans : (iv) unscrupulous

Solved Unseen Passage for Class 8 English

1. Since July 1991, the government of India has effectively put the liberalisation policy into practice. The drastic steps even include some administrative reforms for pruning the government agencies. Last year the Japanese business circles represented by the Ishikawa Mission called attention of their Indian counterparts to what they considered to be the major impediments in India. However, thanks to the almost revolutionary reforms put into effect by the Indian government, those impediments either have been removed or now are on their way out. This development gives a new hope for the future of economic cooperation between the two countries. At the same time, it should be borne in mind that there is a stiff competition with other countries, notably China and South-East Asian countries, in this regard. The success stories of ASEAN countries welcoming Japanese investments with adequate infrastructure are already known in India but it may be useful if further studies of Japanese joint ventures in ASEAN countries be made by Indian business circles. The coastal areas of China have initiated a very active campaign to welcome foreign economic participation.

2. Beyond our bilateral relationship, India’s more active participation in global economy is needed. India certainly deserves a far bigger share of world trade considering its vast resources. It is strongly hoped that the Indian government’s recently initiated effort of enlarging its export market would bear fruit.

3. India has steadfastly maintained its parliamentary democracy since independence. Considering its size, its population and its internal complexity, the overall maintenance of national integrity and political stability under parliamentary democracy is remarkable and admirable indeed. Here lies the base for the status of India in the world. By effectively implementing its economic reform with the support of public opinion, this democratic polity of India has again demonstrated its viability and resilience. At the same time, it gives hope and inspiration to the whole world which faces the difficult problem of North-South confrontation.

Question. How did the Indian government react to the hurdles in the way of bilateral trade between India and Japan?
(i) The government, in principle, agreed for removal of these hurdles.
(ii) It failed to remove these hurdles.
(iii) Government thought it was against liberalization policy.
(iv) The Japanese delegation could not forcefully argue their case.
Ans : (i) The government, in principle, agreed for removal of these hurdles.

Question. What is the result of Japanese investments in
ASEAN nations?
(i) It could not gather momentum for want of infrastructure.
(ii) The experiment failed because of stiff competition from other countries.
(iii) China and South-East Asian countries objected to Japanese investments.
(iv) The passage does not provide complete information.
Ans : (iv) The passage does not provide complete information.

Question. Which of the following is true about the author’s view regarding India’s participation in world trade?
(i) India should actively contribute in a big way as it had tremendous resources.
(ii) India’s sharing in global economy has already been very fast and beyond its resources.
(iii) India should refrain from making efforts in enlarging its export market.
(iv) India needs to first strengthen its democracy.
Ans : (i) India should actively contribute in a big way as it had tremendous resources.

Question. On India’s implementing liberalization policy, the author seems to be
(i) unreasonably critical.
(ii) sarcastic.
(iii) appreciative.
(iv) None of these
Ans : (iii) appreciative.

Question. Choose the word which is most same in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage 
RESILIENCE
(i) quietening
(ii) amplifying
(iii) existence
(iv) adaptability
Ans : (iv) adaptability

Question. It can be inferred from the content of the passage that the author is a/an
(i) political analyser
(ii) Japanese bureaucrat
(iii) economist
(iv) Indian Prime Minister
Ans : (iii) economist

Question. Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage
IMPEDIMENTS
(i) furtherance
(ii) compendium
(iii) obstacle
(iv) aggravation
Ans : (i) furtherance

Question. The author seems to appreciate India’s national integrity and political stability particularly in view of which of the following?
A. the size of the country
B. India’s population
C. its internal complexity
(i) A and B only
(ii) A and C only
(iii) B and C only
(iv) All of these
Ans : (iv) All of these

Question. The Ishikawa Mission during its visit to India emphasized on
(i) future economic co-operation between Japan and India.
(ii) need for removing policy and/or implementation hurdles.
(iii) need for a stiff competition.
(iv) None of these
Ans : (ii) need for removing policy and/or implementation hurdles.

Question. The author feels that India has a better status in the world market because of its 
(i) success in political stability and national integration in democratic set-up.
(ii) vast population.
(iii) giant size.
(iv) effective bilateral relationship with other countries.
Ans : (i) success in political stability and national integration in democratic set-up.

Question. Which of the following statements is true in the context of the passage?
A. India’s successful experiment of economic reform has become an inspiration to the world.
B. size, population and internal complexity of our country area the barriers in the way of attaining national integrity and political
stability.
C. A few government agencies were not in favour of liberalization policy at the beginning.
(i) A only
(ii) B only
(iii) C only
(iv) All of these
Ans : (i) A only

Question. Choose the word which is most same in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage
STEADFASTLY
(i) quickly
(ii) violently
(iii) adversely
(iv) faithfully
Ans : (iv) faithfully

Question. Choose the word which is most same in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage PRUNING
(i) activating
(ii) trimming
(iii) punishing
(iv) encouraging
Ans : (ii) trimming

Question. Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage
STIFF
(i) stubborn
(ii) indelible
(iii) tense
(iv) yielding
Ans : (iv) yielding

Question. Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage
VAST
(i) minute
(ii) meagre
(iii) minor
(iv) innumerable
Ans : (ii) meagre

Passage

Read the passage  carefully:

Modern town planning has overlooked the role of waterways in shaping urban development. As road transport developed and the motor car became civilisation’s poster boy, inland water transport suffered economic undesirability and declined gradually. Waterways, whether natural or man-made, were neglected. They often turned into open sewers. Their banks become sites for ugly slums.

Environmental degradation of cities and frequent water-logging of streets have taken our attention back to rivers and waterways. Water authorities in many countries, including India, are now taking up de-siltation projects. But the larger role of rivers and water bodies in urban life is still not recognised.

Rivers and waterways can have a place in the transport plan of a city or metropolitan area. They should primarily be used for goods’ transport. The essentially slow nature of water transport means such transport is unlikely to serve the needs of the eternally hurried city worker, except when it cuts considerable distances short – a ferry crossing, for example – or when it combines reasonably high speed with special comfort – a river journey on a motor – boat, for example, can be an alternative to a gruelling land journey.

To be a viable alternative to road transport, waterways must be planned as a network. The network must effectively connect with origins and destinations of goods traffic. In the past, rivers were used to transport agriculture and forest products, minerals, iron ore, coal and sometimes construction material as well. Many in the business of such goods are sure to find water transport attractive – and more affordable than road transport – even today. But for that to happen the various depots and godowns, wholesale markets and brick kilns, the ports, railway stations and truck terminals have to be linked with water transport facilities.

Containerisation – use of containers that can be loaded and unloaded, stacked, transported efficiently over long distances, and transferred from one mode of transport to another – is widely used to transport freight over oceans. But inland water transport is not yet equipped to handle this. Its modernisation requires construction of jetties and crafts equipped to carry containerised freight.

But before all that, we need minimum depths of water. Waterways have to be supplied water at times of the year when levels are low. That means waterways will have to be part of the city ecosystem consisting of lakes and ponds. Smaller water bodies will be useful in regulating flows of the larger waterways. Untreated wastewater should not be allowed into the waterways.

Strong statutory support is necessary, otherwise all that I have said here will be found only in planning documents projected great “vision” of future.

1.1 On the basis of your reading of the passage, answer any four of the following questions:

Question. What led to the neglect of waterways as means of transport?
Answer :  
Modern town planning had overlooked the role of waterways as means of transport. As road transport developed and motor car become civilisation poster boy, inland water transport suffered economic undesirability and declined gradually.

QuestionHow has neglecting waterways affected us?
Answer : 
Neglecting waterways affected us by environmental degradation of cities and frequent water logging of streets. The banks have often turned into open sewers. Their banks become sites for ugly slums.

QuestionHow can waterways be made a viable alternative to road transport? How can they benefit industry and business?
Answer : 
Waterways can be a viable alternative to road transport and it must be planned as a network. The network must effectively connect with origin and destination of good traffic. For business and industry water transport are more affordable than road transport.

QuestionWhat is containerisation and why are our country’s inland water transport facilities unable to handle it?
Answer : 
Containerisation is use of containers that can be loaded and unloaded, stocked, transported efficiently over long distances, and transferred from one mode of transport to another. Island water transport is not yet equipped to handle containerisation.

QuestionWhat recommendation does the author make to make waterways usable throughout the year? 
Answer : 
To make waterways usable throughout the year minimum depth of water is needed. Waterways will have to be a part of city ecosystem consisting of lakes and ponds. Smaller water bodies will be useful in regulating flow of the larger waterways.

1.2 Complete any two of the following statements briefly: 

1.In order to make rivers and waterways more suitable for transport …………....….. are being undertaken by many countries including India.

2.“But for that to happen ………….” (Paragraph 4) here ‘that’ refers to …………

3.Despite its slow nature, water transport can become suitable for city dwellers if it: (i) ………….. and (ii) ………… 
Answer : 
1.De-siltation projects 

2.Waterways 

3. (i) a ferry crossing

(ii) a river journey on motor boat 

1.3 Find words/phrases in the passage that mean the same as the following. Attempt any two: 

1. A representative or symbol of something (paragraph 1) 

2. Very difficult and tiring (paragraph 3) 

3. Practically possible (paragraph 4)
Answer : 
1.A representative or symbol of something means Poster boy.

2.Very difficult and tiring means Gruelling.

3.Practically possible means Viable.

 

Passage

Read the Following Carefully:

The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) defines ecotourism as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserve the environment and sustain the well-being of local people”. The term “ecotourism” was coined in 1983 by the Mexican architect-environmentalist Hertor Caballos Lascurain. There are three chief features of eco-tourism – it is responsible tourism and it observes certain basic eco-ethical tenets that are environment and culture specific. Moreover, it recognises and respects fundamental rights like the right to exist or to live in peace, right to pure air and water not only for indigenous people but also for wildlife.

Nature tourism and wildlife tourism are top priority for most tourists, but in Indian context, all picnics, nature walks, nature camps, trekking, hiking, safaris, jungle trails, mountaineering, cultural tours, pilgrimages, beaching, water sports, canoeing, boating and game fishing should all observe eco ethics. One step forward in eco-tourism is to get involved in eco-restoration, biodiversity restoration and eco-development of local people in any degraded tourist ecosystem.

India, with her kaleidoscopic ecosystems and a wealth of cultural heritages of great antiquity, has immense scope for ecotourism. Constant research to identify newer areas and spots for ecotourism, preparing brochures on them and on the eco-ethics relevant to each, organising environmental trails and training knowledgeable guides, preferably using the services of local people to maximise local economic benefits and obtain support for conservation efforts, are the obligations of the tourism department.

The Government should liberalise several infrastructural constraints facing foreign eco-tourists to India. Managers of tourist areas and spots should provide basic services to eco-tourists through educational centres on the spot, supplying information brochures and selling eco-friendly souvenirs. The sale of local plant and animal products should be strictly banned. Conscientious eco-tourist will not buy them. What is more, they will never ever violate the fine balance of eco-systems, denigrate local culture or undermine local economies, trades, arts and crafts. They would do their best to ensure that the local people do not feel slighted or hurt in any way because of their behaviour and activities.

This novel concept of ecotourism is so visionary that in the long run, it would be much more viable economically, sustainable ecologically, acceptable socially and ideal philosophically than traditional tourism.

1.1 On the basis of your reading of the passage, answer any four of the following questions: 

1.What are the three key characteristics of eco-tourism, as described in the first paragraph?
Answer : 
Three characteristics of eco-tourism are as follows:

2.What will be considered a ‘one step forward’ in eco-tourism?
Answer : 
It is responsible tourism.

3.What is the responsibility of the tourism department in promoting eco-tourism?
Answer : 
It observes certain basic eco-ethical tenets that are environment.

4.Why does the author believe India has an immense scope for eco-tourism? What should the government do for foreign eco-tourists?
Answer : 
Culture specific. 

5.What are some of the things that conscientious eco-tourists will avoid doing? 
Answer : 
One step forward in eco-tourism is to get involved in eco-restoration, biodiversity restoration and eco-development of local people in any degraded tourist ecosystem. 

1.2 Complete any two of the following statements briefly: 

1.Top priorities for most tourists are ………………… 

2.Three things that managers of tourist areas should provide to eco-tourists are …………………(c) Services of local people should be used in facilitating eco-tourism in order to ………………
Answer : 
1.Natural tourism and wildlife tourism. 
2.Educational centres, information brochures and eco-friendly souvenirs. 
3.Not feel slighted or hurt in any way because of the behaviour of eco-tourists. 

1.3 Find words/phrases in the passage that mean the opposite of the following. Attempt any two: 

1.Destroy (paragraph 1) 

2.Limited; small (paragraph 3) 

3.Praise; compliment (paragraph 4) 
Answer : 

1.Opposite of destroy is conserve. 

2.Opposite of limited; small is immense. 

3.Opposite of praise; compliment is banned/constraint.

Passage

Read the Following Carefully:

A blind elephant named Suzy, formerly one of India’s 67 remaining circus elephants, has been rescued and is on her way to the Elephant Care and Conservation Centre, run by Wildlife SOS. The road journey will take several days, and she is being escorted by two veterinarians, several para-vets and six elephant workers in a convoy prepared with food and medicine for any eventuality. Her rescue is the first in a campaign to make elephants performing in circuses a thing of the past in India.

Suzy is blind in both eyes and suffered a lot of neglect at the circus where she was forced to perform. She was chained most of the time with little or no exercise. Her dental health appears to be severely compromised, as indicated by the undigested food in the dung that was examined by a team from Wildlife SOS. She has lots of abscesses, injuries and chronic issues that need veterinary intervention. Her age appears to be much more than what was mentioned in the ownership certificate. From close observation of the stereotypic behaviour displayed by Suzy, it was evident to elephant experts that she was subjected to mental torture and continuous chaining and confinement.

Initially, Suzy was shifted to a temporary holding facility of the forest department in Tirupati Zoo, where she was provided veterinary intervention that saved her life. It then took several weeks to get the paperwork and transport documentation to shift Suzy from the temporary holding facility to her final home, where she will receive veterinary care and lifetime support.

The Wildlife SOS team of elephant experts travelled from the Elephant Conservation and Care Center in Mathura to Tirupati Zoo in Andhra Pradesh state to rescue Suzy in cooperation with the State Forest Department. The team reached the location several days prior to the rescue to make the elephant comfortable for the journey. Finally, on the 5th of February, Suzy’s journey started off at 4 a.m. when a team loaded her into the truck and began the drive to Mathura.

Geeta Seshamani, Co-Founder of Wildlife SOS, said, “Suzy’s plight is typical of many captive elephants in the streets and animals being used for performances. We hope the case of Suzy will highlight this issue and will create awareness amongst the public who will not pay for elephant rides and to watch elephants perform in circuses or for touristic activities, we will also encourage people to report to us any such elephant seen in any part of India with pain or injury.

1.1 On the basis of your reading of the passage, answer any four of the following questions: 

Question.“Her rescue is the first …..” who has been rescued and from whom? In what sense is her rescue the ‘first’ of its kind?
Answer : 
The blind elephant, named Suzy has been rescued and from circus by the elephant care and conservation centre, run by wildlife SOS. Her rescue is first of its kind as it was to make to save elephant and stop them from performing in circus. 

Question. What health problems does the rescued animal have? What kind of care does she need?
Answer : 
The rescued animal Suzy was blind in both eyes. She was claimed most of the times and with little or no exercises. Her dental health was severely compromised. She had tools of abscesses, injuries and chronic issues. Her age appeared to be much made than what was mentioned in the ownership certificate. She went through mental torture and continuous chaining and confinement. She needs veterinary intervention.

Question. What preparations were made for Suzy’s rescue?
Answer : 
Suzy was shifted and provided veterinary intervention which saved her life. Several weeks were spend to get the paperwork and transport documentation to shift Suzy from temporary holding facilities to her final home where she received veterinary care and lifetime support.

Question. Why did the rescue take more time than it should have?
Answer : 
The rescue took more time than it should have as the SOS team of elephant experts travelled from elephant conservation and care centre in Mathura to Tirupati Zoo in Andhra Pradesh state to rescue Suzy in cooperation with the state forest department. Team reached at the location several days prior to rescue and make the elephant comfortable for journey. At 4:00 a.m. the truck begins to drive to Mathura.

Question. How can people help save other animals from the cruelty that the rescued elephant was subjected to?
Answer :  
People can help save other animals from the cruelty by not paying for elephant rides and by not watching any performance in circuses or for touristic activities. People must be encouraged to report to wildlife SOS if they witness any pain or injury on any elephant. 

1.2 Complete any two of the following statements briefly: 

1.Undigested food in the animal’s dung suggested that she ………………… 

2.Suzy’s unstable mental health was indicated by ………………… 

3.“We hope the case of Suzy will highlight this issue”. (Paragraph 5) The ‘issue’ referred to here is ……………… 
Answer : 
1.  Was suffering from dental problems.

2.Close observation of stereotypic behaviour. 

3.Captivates of animals for the purpose of making money by riding, making them to perform in the circuses.. 

1.3 Find words/phrases in the passage that mean the same as the following. Attempt any two: 

1.An event or emergency situation (paragraph 1) 

2.Of long duration or very serious (paragraph 2) 

3.Bad, difficult or unfortunate condition or situation (paragraph 5) 
Answer : 
1.An event or emergency situation means 

2.Of long duration or very serious means severely. 

3.Bad, difficult or unfortunate condition or situation means plight.

Passage

More Class 10 English Unseen Passage

A great defect of our civilisation is that it does not know what to do with its knowledge. Science has given us powers fit for the Gods, yet we use them like small children. For example, we do not know how tp manage our machines. Machines were made to be mans servants. Yet he has grown so dependent on them that they are in a fair way to become his masters. Already most men spend most of their lives looking after and waiting upon machines. And the machines are very stern masters. They must be kept at the right temperature. And
if they do not get their meals when they expect them, they grow sulky and refuse to work or burst with rage and blow up and spread ruin and destruction all round them. So we have to wait upon them very attentively and do all that we can to keep them in a good temper. Already we find it difficult either to work or play without the machines and a time may come when they will rule us altogether, just as we rule the animals.
And this brings me to the point where I want to ask, what we do with all the time which the machines have saved for us and the new energy they have given us? On the whole, it must be admitted, we do very little. For the most part we use our time and energy to make more and better machines which will give us still more time and still more energy, and what are we to do with them? The answer I think is that we should try to become more civilised. For, the machines themselves and the power which the machines have given us are not civilisation, but aids to civilisation. But being civilised means making and liking beautiful things, thinking freely and living rightly and maintaining justice. Man has a better chance today to do these things than he ever had before; he has more time, more energy, less to fear and less to fight against. If he will give his time and energy, which his machines have won for him, to making more beautiful things, to finding out more and more about the universe, to removing the causes of quarrels between nations, to discovering how to prevent poverty, then I think our civilisation would undoubtedly be greater, as it would be more lasting than it has ever been.
 
Question. What is the defect of our civilisation?
Answer. Science has given humans abundant powers which have the potential fit for the Gods, but we use them for our petty chores and problems. We do not know how to use them for bigger and better purposes.

Question. How can we say that the machines are demanding?
Answer. Machines have now become the masters of man. They demand extensive maintenance and proper usage. On our failure to do so, machines may refuse to work and burst in rage.

Question. What does being civilised mean? How should we use the extra time we have now?
Answer. Being civilised means making and liking beautiful things, thinking freely and maintaining justice. We should use our extra time and energy in trying to become more civilised.

Question. Man has a better chance to be civilised now. Support the statement.
Answer. Man has a better chance to be civilised now because he has more time and energy which the machines have saved for him, less to fear and less to fight against. Thus, he can utilise these resources for betterment of humankind and removing the causes of quarrels between nations.

Question. Which word in paragraph 1 means 'violent behaviour
Answer. rage

Question. Find the antonym of the word 'stern' from paragraph 1.
Answer. friendly
 
Question. What were machines made to be?
Answer. Machines were made to be man’s servants

Question. h. What does man do with all the time that machine has saved for him?
Answer. In the time that man has saved, be tries to make more and better machines which would give him more time and more energy
 
Passage

Read the Following Carefully:

In 1995, the then World Bank vice president, Ismail Sera gelding said, “If the wars of this century were fought over oil, the wars of the next century will be fought over water.”

With World Water Day being celebrated on March 22 every year, it is deeply disturbing to realise that with each passing day our deepest worry is the future of the planets fresh water supply. Imagine taking shorter showers, shallower baths and using minimum water for washing, cooking, cleaning and gardening.

Only three per cent of the world’s water is fresh water. The remaining 97 per cent is too brackish for humans and most animals to use. The situation in Chennai should serve as a glaring example of how grave the problem of water shortage is in our country.

Rainwater harvesting and water recycling are two solution which should be seriously looked at and if found feasible, actively implemented. Speaking on rainwater harvesting, Mr. Rudolf D’Souza of EFIE explains, “Rainwater is the purest form of water (apart from distillation). Mumbai is blessed with abundant rainfall spread over a reasonable period. We get a lot of rain, but yet we do not have water, because we allow almost all of it flow into the sea. It will not matter how much rainfall we get if we do not utilised this resource. So we need to look at this free source of pure water differently.”

Rainwater harvesting begins with a simple idea. Rain gutters are already collecting the water that falls on your roof. To harvest that water all that is needed is to change the direction of the flow so that instead of running onto the ground, the water flows into a storage tank.

The quality of the water itself makes the investment worthwhile. Rainwater typically has very low hardness levels, which reduces the use of soap and detergents and eliminates the need for the water softener. Stored rainwater also is a good standby in times of emergencies such as power outages or during periods of extreme drought. “And because it does not have to be treated, pumped or distributed through a complex network, rainwater harvesting saves energy and the use of chemicals”, explained Rudolf. Many State Governments have already made rainwater harvesting mandatory for all new buildings.

Speaking on the current problem Rudolf adds, “we actually need to make a habit of conservation. Only 20 per cent of the piped water is used for drinking, cooking and bathing, where that quality water is required; and 80 per cent is wasted – like in flushing the toilet / gardening / washing the car and so on. How many people collect water discharged from the washing machine and use it for flushing? You can save 100 litres of water that way. Simple things like fixing leaking taps, using adjustable short flushing systems can conserve water.

EFIE aims to highlight the message that today water resources are scant and hence safeguarding measures are needed. If each person consciously saved two litres of water a day – we could save millions of litres of water every day.

1.1 On the basis of your reading of the passage, answer any four of the following questions:

Question. Why does Ismail Seragelding fear that the next world war might be fought over water? How can it be averted?
Answer : 
Is mail Seragelding fears that the next world war might be fought over water because with each passing day, deepest worry in the future of the earth is planets fresh water. Fresh water is only 3% of world’s water. 

Question. How will shortage of water in future affect our daily life?
Answer : 
Shortage of water in future affect our daily life as it will lead to shorter showers, shallow and using minimum water of washing, cooking cleaning and gardening. 

Question. Why does Mumbai not have enough water in spite of getting a lot of rain? What suggestions does the author offer to confront water shortage in the city?
Answer : 
Mumbai have blessed with abundant rainfall, till does not have enough water because people allow almost all of the rain to flow into the sea. Rainwater harvesting and water recycling are two suggestion offered to confront water storage in the city. 

Question. What ‘simple idea’ does the author refer to in paragraph 5 of the passage?
Answer : 
‘Simple idea” means rainwater harvesting is a simple and easy process. To harvest the water all that is needed is to change the direction of flow so instead of running unto the ground. The water flows into a storage tank. 

Question. Why does investing in rainwater harvesting make sense? 
Answer : 
Investing in rainwater harvesting makes sense because rainwater has low hardness level. Stored rain water is a good standby in the times of emergencies such as power outages or during the periods of extreme drought. 

1.2 Complete any two of the following statements briefly: 

1.The situation in Chennai indicates ………………… 

2.Two solutions to the problem of water shortage are ……………. and ………………… 

3.People can save at least 100 litres of water by ……………… 
Answer : 
1.How grave the problem of water shortage is there in our country.

2.Water harvesting and water recycle. 

3.Collecting the water discharged from washing machine and use it for flushing. 

1.3 Find words/phrases in the passage that mean the same as the following. Attempt any two: 

1.Noticeable; obvious (paragraph 2-3) 

2.Salty to taste (paragraph 2-3) 

3.Plentiful (paragraph 4-5) 
Answer : 
1.Noticeable; obvious means glaring. 

2.Salty to taste means Brackish. 

3.Plentiful means abundant.

Passage

More Class 10 English Unseen Passage

How you can best improve your English depends on where you live and particularly on whether or not you live in an English speaking community. If you hear English spoken every day and mix freely with English speaking people, that is on the whole an advantage. On the other hand, it is often confusing to have the whole language, poured over you at once. Ideally, a step-by-step course should accompany this experience. It will also help a great deal if you can easily get the sort of English books in which you are interested.


To read a lot is essential. It is stupid not to venture outside the examination ‘set books’ or the textbooks you have chosen for intensive study. Read as many books in English as you can, not as a duty but for pleasure.
Do not choose the most difficult books you find, with the idea of listing and learning as many new words as possible : choose what is likely to interest you and be sure in advance that it is not too hard. You should not have to be constantly looking up new words in the dictionary, for that deadens interest and checks real learning. Look up a word here and there, but as a general policy try to push ahead, guessing what words mean from the context. It is extensive and not intensive reading that normally helps you to get interested in extra reading and thereby improve your English. You should enjoy the feeling which extensive reading gives of having some command of the language. As you read, you will become more and more familiar with words and sentence patterns you already know, understanding them better and better as you meet them in more and more contexts, some of which may differ only slightly from others.
Some people say that we cannot learn to speak a language better with the help of a book. To believe this is to believe that the spoken language and the written language are quite different things. This is not so. There is a very great deal in common between the two. In learning the patterns and vocabulary of the written form, we are learning to a considerable extent those of the spoken form too. We are, in fact, learning the language and not merely one form of the language.


Read the passage and answer the following questions : 

Question. What advantage does the author talk about in the first paragraph?

Answer. The author writes about the advantages people living in an English speaking community derive. According to the author, it is beneficial if we hear English being spoken around us every day and mix freely with English speaking people.


Question. Why is it essential to read books?

Answer. It is essential to read books because reading introduces us to real learning. We learn new words and sentence patterns of the language, thus gaining command over it. Reading outside our examinations 'set books’ also gives us joy.


Question. Which form of reading may improve your English?

Answer. Extensive reading is the form of reading that builds up our interest. It improves our English and lets us rejoice the hold we gain over the language with time.


Question. Can we learn to speak a language from a book?

Answer. Yes, we can learn to speak a language from a book. It is because the patterns and vocabulary a book teaches about the written form of the language are similar to the ones used in the spoken form.


Question. Which word in paragraph 3 means 'notably large or significant'?

Answer. considerable


Question. Find the antonym of the word 'essential'?

Answer. optional


Question. Why one should not choose to read difficult books?

Answer. One should not choose to read a difficult book as in doing so you would keep on looking for the meanings of difficult words

 

Question. On what two things how best can you improve your English depends?

Answer. It depends on where you live and whether or not your live in an English speaking community.

 

Tags: 

 


Click for more English Study Material

Latest NCERT & CBSE News

Read the latest news and announcements from NCERT and CBSE below. Important updates relating to your studies which will help you to keep yourself updated with latest happenings in school level education. Keep yourself updated with all latest news and also read articles from teachers which will help you to improve your studies, increase motivation level and promote faster learning

Pariksha Pe Charcha 2022

The 5th edition of Pariskhas Pe Charcha the unique interactive program of Hon’ble Prime Minister with students teaches and parents will be held through virtual mode in February, 2022. In order to select participants who will be featured in Pariksha Pe Charcha programme...

All India Children Educational Audio Video Festival

The Central Institute of Educational Technology (CIET), a constituent unit of National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT), is inviting entries for the 26th All India Children’s Educational Audio Video Festival (AICEAVF). This festival showcases the...

Surya Namaskar Project on 75th Anniversary of Independence Day

Ministry of Education, Govt of India vide letter No. F.No. 12-5/2020-IS-4 dated 16.12.2021 has intimated that under the banner Azadi ka Amrit Mahotsav the National Yogasanasports Federation has decided to run a project of 750 million Surya Namaskar from 01 January 2022...

CBSE Science Challenge 2021 22

Science is inexplicably linked with our lives and helps us to understand the world around us better. Scientific and technological developments contribute to progress and help improve our standards of living. By engaging with this subject, students learn to think, solve...

Celebration of Matribhasha Diwas Mother Language day

UNESCO has declared 21st February of every year to be celebrated as International Mother Language day to promote dissemination of Mother Language of all, create awareness of linguistic and cultural traditions and diversity across the world and to inspire solidarity...

Board Exams Date Sheet Class 10 and Class 12

Datesheet for CBSE Board Exams Class 10  (Scroll down for Class 12 Datesheet) Datesheet for CBSE Board Exams Class 12